What TV series should you binge right now? Start here with the 50 best shows on Netflix, ranked.
Last Updated: April 23rd
There are plenty of good TV series on Netflix Instant (and you can find more with these secret codes). If you’re trying to figure out what to watch next, here’s a great place to start with a look at 50 of the best shows on Netflix right now, ranked (including some of the best Netflix original series). You can also find recent changes, including new seasons and removed shows, at the bottom of this list.
Related: The 20 Funniest Movies On Netflix Right Now
Atypical is the kind of single-camera sitcom that would feel right at home among ABC’s family sitcoms like Speechless, Black-ish, Fresh off the Boat and The Goldbergs (in fact, creator Robia Rashid previously worked as a producer on The Goldbergs). It’s a charming coming-of-age show about Sam Gardner (Keir Gilchrist), an 18-year-old from Connecticut with high-functioning autism. He’s arrived at an age when he’s decided that he’d like to date and have sex. The first season — a batch eight half-hour episodes — covers his awkward encounters with women, his inappropriate crush on his therapist, and his relationship with the teenage girl he eventually asks to prom. It also deals with the challenges of his parents. His father (Michael Rapaport) is trying to figure out how to truly connect with his son for the first time while his mother (Jennifer Jason Leigh) aims to find her own identity apart from being the mother of an autistic child. It’s the older sister (Brigette Lundy-Paine) who is the real stand-out of Atypical. Like the big sister in the film and book series, Wonder, she aims to both support her brother while also carving out a life of her own separate from Sam. It’s not a groundbreaking series, and it has been criticized for its stereotypical depiction of autism, but it nevertheless funny, heartwarming, and very sweet.
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In theory, American Vandal sounds silly and sophomoric, and it is, but it’s also a genuinely brilliant, incredibly clever, smartly written satire of true-crime documentaries. It plays just like any other true crime docuseries — interviews, investigations, multiple suspects, and numerous conspiracy theories — only the crime here is not a murder. It’s a high-school student who has been accused by the school board of spray painting dicks on 27 cars, a crime that threatens his ability to graduate. It’s a brilliant whodunnit that just happens to also be the best parody of 2017, along with recently taking home a Peabody Award.
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