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The Fall Guys launch trailer is adorable and inspiring

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Here’s the launch trailer for Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout. It’s funny, cute, and weirdly inspirational in these uncertain times?
Here’s the launch trailer for Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout. It’s funny, cute, and weirdly inspirational in these uncertain times? Published on By Here’s the launch trailer for Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout. It’s funny, cute, and weirdly inspirational in these uncertain times? Fall Guys, our favourite video game from E3 2029, is out today on PS4 and PC. It’s a charming little riff on the battle royale model, but instead of shooty murder, it’s rooted in Takeshi’s Castle and soft play areas. (In fact, publisher Devolver Digital’s E3 2020 setup for Fall Guys was set in a soft play area and had a ball pit. It was lovely!) Following an enormous beta, in which tens of thousands of keys were given away, the scrappy little game, developed by Mediatonic, has bumbled its way to the top of the Twitch stats, unseating Fortnite, Call of Duty, and even the ‘Just Chatting’ category. The Fall Guys launch hasn’t been without issue, however, as the game’s servers are creaking under massive player demand. Nicer problems to have, we guess? To go along with the game’s launch – and following the theme of a bumbling little underdog, doing their best – Mediatonic and Devolver have put together a Fall Guys launch trailer. It’s a video about a jelly bean who, at first, doesn’t do particularly well. But with some time, experience, and perseverance, they succeed in the end. It’s strangely inspirational? Want to know if your PC can run it? (You know, when the servers have the capacity.) Check out the Fall Guys system requirements. Found it interesting, entertaining, useful, or informative? Maybe it even saved you some money. That’s great to hear! Sadly, independent publishing is struggling worse than ever, and Thumbsticks is no exception. So please, if you can afford to, consider supporting us via Patreon or buying us a coffee. Tom is an itinerant freelance technology writer who found a home as an Editor with Thumbsticks. Powered by coffee, RPGs, and local co-op. Carrion gets summer release on PC, Xbox One, and Switch Devolver Digital announces stressful-looking Disc Room Fall Guys player count reduced from 100 to 60 Murder by Numbers PC and Switch release date confirmed What are the Fall Guys system requirements? Experimental horror anthology Stories Untold comes to Nintendo Switch very soon We’re always looking for new blood at Thumbsticks. Right now, we need some freelance video game news writers. Published on By We’re always looking for new blood at Thumbsticks. Right now, we need some freelance video game news writers. At Thumbsticks, we’re (almost) always looking for new writers. It’s just a thing we do. One of our key goals is to provide opportunities for new talent and different voices. But every now and then, we’re looking for something in particular. We might be looking for a new group of reviewers or some new feature perspectives, for instance. Right now, though, we’re looking for new freelance video game news writers. So have a read of this, and if it sounds like something you might be interested in? Get in touch. People who can write short news stories, to a high standard and in keeping with the house style, with minimal supervision. Ideally, this will be within UK business hours. These stories will be very light reporting and will typically cover things like new game announcements, trailers, releases and updates, sales and discounts, and general industry news. (That’s not to say that longer, more heavily reported work isn’t available, but those pieces are commissioned on a case-by-case basis.) We’re looking for people who want to be writers, first and foremost. Yes, most people who want to write about video games also tend to love playing them, but that is not, in itself, a qualification. You don’t have to be experienced, have any journalism qualifications or a background in professional writing, but that desire to be a writer first and foremost is key. As a result, this would be ideal for journalism students or graduates, or for anyone looking to get into freelance games writing as a main career or side hustle. Other than that? We don’t really care who you are! We would, however, love to receive applications from people that aren’t young, white men, because honestly? We get loads of those and this industry needs some new voices, thank you very much. You can be based anywhere in the world, as long as your written English is to a high standard and you can produce news during UK business hours. We do need you to be at least 18 years old, though, so we’re not accidentally exploiting child labour. You’ll apply by email, including a little bit of information about who you are and why you’d like to write for us, and include any clips of relevant published work. (Don’t have any clips? That’s fine! Write a short sample to show off your skills.) If you’re successful you will receive your first couple of assignments by email from one of our commissioning editors. Once you’ve got a couple of pieces under your belt and we’re all happy working together, we’ll create you an account on our CMS so you can prep your own articles, and also invite you to the Thumbsticks Slack. (If you’re not familiar with Slack, it’s like Discord, but for work.) We use Slack as an informal way of pitching stories. This is so you can be sure we’re interested in the piece you’re planning to write, but also so you don’t end up clashing or doubling up with another writer who might have had the same idea. An informal pitch is usually a writer asking if we’re looking for coverage of something they’ve seen, perhaps with a summary of the angle they’d like to approach it from, or it might be the Thumbsticks editorial team asking if anyone is available to cover something. Once you’ve got the nod from one of the editors you will prepare your piece then submit it for review. We’ll take a look over it and, assuming there are no major changes required, add the finishing touches and publish it. That’s it. That’s the process. The whole thing is really simple and straightforward. An experienced writer can easily bash out a short,250-word news story in 15 minutes and, depending on content schedules and editor availability, you’ll often see it live on the site within an hour or two.

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