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India's mobile app ban threatens china's rise as a global tech power

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Read more about India’s mobile app ban threatens china’s rise as a global tech power on Business Standard. It may present a model for other countries from Europe to Southeast Asia that seek to curtail the pervasiveness of apps like ByteDance’s TikTok while safeguarding their citizens’ valuable data.
China over the past decade built an alternate online reality where Google and Facebook barely exist. Now its own largest tech corporations from Alibaba Group Holding to Tencent Holdings are getting a taste of what a shutout feels like.
The unprecedented decision to ban 59 of China’s largest apps is a warning to the country’s tech giants, who for years thrived behind a government-imposed Great Firewall that kept out many of America’s best-known internet names. If India finds a way to carry out that threat, it may present a model for other countries from Europe to Southeast Asia that seek to curtail the pervasiveness of apps like ByteDance’s while safeguarding their citizens’ enormously valuable data.
The surprise moratorium hit Chinese internet just as they were beginning to make headway in the world’s fastest-growing mobile arena, en route to going global and challenging American tech industry supremacy. had signed up 200 million users there, Xiaomi is the No.1 smartphone brand, and Alibaba and Tencent have aggressively pushed their services.
But India’s policy jeopardises all those successes, and could have wider geopolitical consequences as the US seeks to rally countries to stop using Huawei Technologies for 5G networks. With China’s tech poised to become some of the most dominant in emerging industries like artificial intelligence, India’s actions may spur countries around the world to weigh the extent to which they let China gain user data — and potentially economic leverage in future disputes.
Chinese internet firms have struggled to replicate their online services beyond their home turf, even before Washington lawmakers began raising concerns about the wisdom of allowing the Asian country’s corporations — like ByteDance — to hoover up valuable personal data.

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