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George Floyd protest live updates: Governor 'fully mobilizing' National Guard in Minnesota

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The governor of Minnesota said Saturday he would be “fully mobilizing” the National Guard after overnight protests that he said were no longer about the death…
The governor of Minnesota said Saturday he would be “fully mobilizing” the National Guard after overnight protests that he said were no longer about the death of George Floyd but rather an “attack” on civil society.
“The situation in Minnesota is no longer in any way about the murder of George Floyd. It is about attacking civil society, instilling fear and disrupting our great cites,” Gov. Tim Walz said in a morning press conference.
Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died Monday after a white Minneapolis police officer kept his knee pressed into his neck for more than eight minutes. Across the country, protesters took to the streets for a fourth day to express their anger of his death.
In scenes both peaceful and violent, thousands of protesters chanted “No justice, no peace” and “Say his name. George Floyd.” They hoisted signs reading: “He said I can’t breathe. Justice for George.”
Walz said he spoke with the Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs on Saturday, as well as with mayors across the country, and was “fully mobilizing” the state’s National Guard for the first time in Minnesota’s history. Walz alleged that the protests were fueled by elements of domestic terrorism, ideological extremists and international destabilization.
Meanwhile, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said protests in the city Tuesday were largely peaceful and organized by Minneapolis residents, but that the “dynamic has changed over the last several days.”
“I want to be very, very clear: The people that are doing this are not Minneapolis residents,” Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said.
Every person arrested in his St. Paul on Friday night were from out of state, Mayor Melvin Carter said in the morning conference. “What we’re seeing now is a group of people who are not from here,” Carter said. “We don’t know these folks.”
Stay up-to-date on the George Floyd story by signing up for USA TODAY’s Daily Briefing. Here are the latest developments:
Read this: Experts say knee-to-neck restraint is dangerous, but Minneapolis allows it.
‘A riot is the language of the unheard’: MLK’s powerful quote resonates amid George Floyd protests
Our live blog will be updated throughout the day. Scroll down for the latest. Follow USA TODAY reporters Trevor Hughes and Tyler Davis for reports from the scene.
Morning dawned bright in Minneapolis, the sun highlighting the columns of smoke dotting the horizon and burned-out cars scattered at intersections as the smell of burning rubber and plastic filled the air.
Authorities had moved back into some formerly contested areas, and on Saturday morning, firefighters with the Minneapolis Fire Department poured water onto a still-smoldering gas station in the Hiawatha area as a small crowd watched. No police were present.
Over on Lake Street at Columbus Avenue, members of the Minnesota National Guard controlled access to the streets, their Humvees and trucks blocking the road as firefighters and public works officials tried to shut off leaking gas lines and clear rubble from the road.
Because some areas lost power, drivers collided yesterday when speeding through stoplights that weren’t working, and their abandoned crashed cars were then set ablaze. Broken glass from shattered windows and bus stops crunched underfoot.
“This is sad. It’s very emotional right now. I just had to come down and see it,” said Brian Ledin, 58, who lives in a nearby suburb but was born in the area, as smoke rose from an O’Reilly Auto Parts store and CenterPoint energy workers searched for broken gas lines.
Wearing face masks, Anton Reuter and Beno Boda, both 17, picked up trash strewn in the street.
The two, who live nearby, said they had heard reports that troublemakers from outside downtown Minneapolis have been flooding into the area last night causing damage. They wanted people to know that those who live here care about this neighborhood.
“It’s not going to get better waiting on the government,” Boda said.

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