In a personal, and historic, tribute, former President George W. Bush delivered a eulogy for his father and presidential predecessor in a state funeral at the National Cathedral.
Dec. 6 (UPI) — In a personal, and historic, tribute, former President George W. Bush delivered a eulogy for his father and presidential predecessor in a state funeral at the National Cathedral.
Former President George H. W. Bush, the nation’s 41st president, died Friday at age 94. George W. Bush served as the United States‘ 43rd president.
The George W. Bush Presidential Center released the full text of his eulogy at Wednesday’s funeral, which was attended by President Donald Trump and all living former U. S. presidents, as well as world leaders.
„Distinguished guests, including our presidents and first ladies, government officials, foreign dignitaries and friends: Jeb, Neil, Marvin, Doro and I, and our families, thank you all for being here.
I once heard it said of man that ‚The idea is to die young as late as possible.‘ [Laughter.]
At age 85, a favorite pastime of George H. W. Bush was firing up his boat, the Fidelity, and opening up the three 300-horsepower engines to fly — joyfully fly — across the Atlantic, with Secret Service boats straining to keep up.
At 90, George H. W. Bush parachuted out of an aircraft and landed on the grounds of St. Ann’s by the Sea in Kennebunkport, Maine — the church where his mom was married and where he’d worshiped often. Mother liked to say he chose the location just in case the chute didn’t open. [Laughter.]
In his 90s, he took great delight when his closest pal, James A. Baker, smuggled a bottle of Grey Goose vodka into his hospital room. Apparently, it paired well with the steak Baker had delivered from Morton’s. [Laughter.]
To his very last days, Dad’s life was instructive. As he aged, he taught us how to grow old with dignity, humor and kindness — and, when the Good Lord finally called, how to meet Him with courage and with joy in the promise of what lies ahead.
One reason Dad knew how to die young is that he almost did it — twice. When he was a teenager, a staph infection nearly took his life. A few years later, he was alone in the Pacific on a life raft, praying that his rescuers would find him before the enemy did.
God answered those prayers. It turned out He had other plans for George H. W. Bush. For Dad’s part, I think those brushes with death made him cherish the gift of life. And he vowed to live every day to the fullest.
Dad was always busy — a man in constant motion — but never too busy to share his love of life with those around him. He taught us to love the outdoors. He loved watching dogs flush a covey. He loved landing the elusive striper. And once confined to a wheelchair, he seemed happiest sitting in his favorite perch on the back porch at Walker’s Point contemplating the majesty of the Atlantic. The horizons he saw were bright and hopeful. He was a genuinely optimistic man. And that optimism guided his children and made each of us believe that anything was possible.
He continually broadened his horizons with daring decisions. He was a patriot.

Continue reading...