Домой United States USA — Art Handshakes at the U. S. Open are rare… but do happen

Handshakes at the U. S. Open are rare… but do happen

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NEW YORK (AP) — When he was disqualified from the U.S. Open for unintentionally hitting a line judge with a ball after losing a point, Novak Djokovic walked to the sideline and extended his r…
NEW YORK — When he was disqualified from the U. S. Open for unintentionally hitting a line judge with a ball after losing a point, Novak Djokovic walked to the sideline and extended his right arm toward his fourth-round foe, Pablo Carreño Busta. Carreño Busta didn’t hesitate after Sunday’s stunning default to grasp Djokovic’s hand — that is, after all, the standard way tennis players show sportsmanship and mutual respect at the end of a match, usually at the net. Standard in normal times, anyway. Less so in today’s socially distanced, coronavirus-compromised world, where the customary has become taboo. So handshakes and hugs are few and far between at the U. S. Open — even as NHL playoff series still are ending with the traditional handshake lines and walkoff wins and a no-hitter in Major League Baseball inspired full-contact celebrations reminiscent of the good ol’ days. “You’ve spent your whole career doing things one way,” said two-time major finalist Kevin Anderson, a South African. “But we have to make an adjustment. It’s obviously indicative of much larger things at play.” So over these unique two weeks at Flushing Meadows — where there is regular on-site COVID-19 testing, spectators are banned, masks are required for everyone except when eating, and players have to fetch their own towels during matches — the popular replacement gesture at match’s end is a racket tap. “The point gets across,” said Jessica Pegula, a 63rd-ranked American who reached the third round.

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